Heterotopia-54.jpg
       
     
  HETEROTOPIA (2014-present)   The title of this new series is derived from French philosopher Michel Foucault’s essay “Des Espaces Autres” in which he uses the term “heterotopia” to describe “spaces of otherness” that are “neither here nor there,” such as the moment one sees himself in the mirror, or gardens, which represent truly ambiguous and contradictory spaces where nature and artifice collide in a form of utopia.  For the past decade I have investigated the notion of space – not only as a physical or geographical place, but also as a mental or imaginary space – and our relationship to the environment, between the natural and the artificial. The images  in this series were photographed in various private and public gardens in the United States and Europe. The distortions, superimpositions and colors are not the result of digital manipulation; they were created in camera and with reflective surfaces, using the natural environment as both a plein air studio and the subject matter. The colors, contributing to a vision of enhanced or transformed reality, act as a vehicle to translate a world in transition, oscillating between a psychedelic vision of nature and a toxic and artificial post-natural world.    Heterotopia   was partly inspired by writer J. G. Ballard, particularly his fantasy novel  The Unlimited Dream Company  (1979), which I was reading when I started to work on the project. 
       
     
Artificial by Nature | Benrubi Gallery, New York | May 19 - July 1, 2016
       
     
  BLACK PALMS   Black Palms is a series of images of Los Angeles palm trees, shot from below and solarized, leaving behind vast black fields jaggedly slashed with silver etchings. The zigzag tracings of the palm leaves recall photograms or the stylized manipulations of light in film noir (in which many of these trees were once featured), while the inky gloss of the images simultaneously reflects viewers’ gaze and sucks them into an interstellar vastness. But as with the images in  Heterotopia , the quotidian reality is discernible, leaving viewers with the uneasy yet uplifting suggestion that the world is what we think it is only because of long-held and often-unconscious patterns of association. There is always more to see.     Untitled #1, 2014   
       
     
SCAN_1_1.jpg
       
     
   
  
 
  
    
  
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   CHROMASCAPES    This new body of work comprises a series of videos and unique pigment prints translating data and emotions through a lengthy and complex process that combines the recycling and regenerating of media in what could be described as a digital moving collage. The work is part of a broader investigation, which I began when I created two pieces presented at NYCAMS (New York Center for Art & Media Studies) for John Cage’s centennial in 2012 (a    video installation/performance    and a mix-media mural). This marked a departure in my practice and approach to photography, which I would describe as a shift from “taking pictures” to “making images”. This evolution in my work came from the inevitable confrontation with digital technologies, the frustration resulting from it and also the renewed possibilities it offers to go beyond the boundaries of the medium and to explore and combine different disciplines (video, photography, performance, painting).
       
     
   
  
 
  
    
  
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     An image that is grainy, indistinct, or dispersed over the surface of the screen invites a haptic look, or a look that uses the eye like an organ of touch . – Laura U. Marks in “Loving a Disappearing Image”   Link  to the installation   Anatomy of Desire   at Theaterlab NYC (March 2015)   Link  to video   White Nights
       
     
PENUMBRA
       
     
   
  
 
  
    
  
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	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}      Rebellious Slave #7, 2012   Mix-media collage, 13x19”, unique  Projected larger format: approx. 42x61” (work in progress), unique (with 2 variations)
       
     
[ ON SILENCE ]
       
     
Altered States (2012)
       
     
Poolscapes (2009-2012)
       
     
The Pool (2002-2005)